Here's a bio I got from the Blitzed - An All Out Attack cd. The opinions expressed are not my own, because I didn't write it. I will replace it once I have something better....

New Mills in Derbyshire seems an unlikely birth place for one of Britainís top Oi! bands, but this was the home of the two Punks and two Skins who made up the band. It was Gary Bushell (who wrote for "Sounds" and was later dubbed the God Father of Oi!) that brought the group to the attention of the Oi! World and in particular to the attention of Chris Berry who had just set up No Future records with a bank loan and high hopes. The labels first 7" release was a 4 track EP entitled "All Out Attack" it was Blitz's second demo. It out sold the initial pressing of a thousand and reached number three in the UK independent charts in August '81. As it turned out, over 20,000 copies were purchased by the fans eager to hear the fast almost thrash sound of Blitz - not bad for the bands and labels debut. It was on the live circuit that the lads gained notoriety. They enjoyed antagonizing the audience. Although it wasn't always verbal abuse, cans and bottles were also thrown and more than once cocky Carl the singer would have come a cropper if it wasn't for quick thinking of the security men. That was what Blitz was all about, it seems right from the beginning they were on a self destruct countdown, it's what made them who they were. Blitz's second singer "Never Surrender" shot up the indie charts and in March '82 it reach number two. The band had originally wanted to release the "Time Bomb demos." The bands 3rd single "Warriors" saw a slight change in sound for Blitz. The band was moving more towards the singalong street anthems not unlike the Business or the 4-Skins. Many fanzines and Oi! pundits of the time thought "No Future" should've had a stab at the national singles chart, but Chris Berry had stretched his resources too thing with the fast growing label. There simply wasn't enough money to promote the single. It peaked at number two in the indie charts in august '82. As it turned out it was a missed opportunity as the bands debut album "Voice of a Generation" reached number 27 in the nation album chart, with no promotion whatsoever. I will never forget seeing the news program "Nationwide" on BBC1 when they featured the band. They were asked why they were a voice of a generation. As usual the media had tried to make something out of nothing and were a little taken back when they were told "It's just a good title." To promote the album, the band joined GBH and Abrasive Wheels on tour. It sound the death knell for Blitz. The groups played in large venues and as it turned out the expectations of the promoter were far too ambitious. The tour, for want of a better word, was a disaster. Mackie had had enough. Tim Harris stepped in to help the band out. He had been the groups producer and engineer. Shortly afterwards Nidge called it a day and he joined Mackie to form "Rose of Victory." Carl and Tim carried on as Blitz and in February released "New Age." The group had totally changed direction, although dedicated fans pushed it up to number two in the indie charts. The follow up "Telecommunication" did just as well, but the sound was more "New Romantic" than Punk and the group received a lot of flak. By the time the band released their second album "Second Empire Of Justice" it was all over, the bubble had burst. For many Blitz died after "Warriors," as their later singles do them no justice, but for the short time that Blitz reigned the Street music scene they were the "Voice of a Generation." Toast, April 1999